Favourite this Job

Market Research Analyst

Kaitātari Rangahau Hokohoko

Alternative titles for this job

Market research analysts collect and analyse data and information, write reports, and make recommendations to their clients based on their research.

Pay

Market research analysts with up to five years' experience usually earn

$40K-$70K per year

Senior market research analysts with over five years' experience usually earn

$70K-$125K per year

Source: Ipsos, Perceptive, and Research Association New Zealand, 2018.

Job opportunities

Chances of getting a job as a market research analyst are average due to stable worker numbers and steady turnover.

Pay

Pay for market research analysts varies depending on skills, experience, employer, and the type of work they do.

  • Graduate market research analysts usually earn $40,000 to $45,000 a year.
  • Market research analysts with one to two years' experience usually earn $45,000 to $55,000.
  • Market research analysts with two to five years' experience usually earn between $55,000 and $70,000.
  • Senior market research analysts with over five years' experience usually earn between $70,000 and $125,000.

Source: Ispos, 2018; Perceptive, 2018; and Research Association New Zealand, 2018.

(This information is a guide only. Find out more about the sources of our pay information)

What you will do

Market research analysts may do some or all of the following:

  • discuss research topics, methods and objectives with clients
  • do background research on the topic
  • design, organise, and manage surveys
  • conduct interviews with groups or individuals to find out the public's opinion on a topic such as a company's products
  • supervise survey staff
  • analyse and evaluate data and information from a variety of sources
  • write and present reports and recommendations to clients.

Skills and knowledge

Market research analysts need to have knowledge of:

  • questionnaire design
  • survey and interview methods
  • research methods
  • data collection and analysis methods
  • marketing techniques.

Working conditions

Market research analysts:

  • usually work regular business hours, but may also work evenings and weekends
  • generally work in offices
  • may travel locally, nationally or internationally to meet with clients, run focus groups, or attend training and conferences.

What's the job really like?

Andrew Dodge

Andrew Dodge

Market Research Analyst

How did you get into market research?

"While I was studying I took several market research papers and was curious to find out more about the industry.

"In my final year, I met a classmate who was working part time at Ipsos. He felt I would be a good fit for the company, so when a position opened up after I finished studying I went along for an interview and have been here ever since!"

What do you find most enjoyable about your job?

"I enjoy working with a great team of people. It's definitely one of the best things about the role.

"I also enjoy the variety of the job. Working for a range of clients keeps me on my toes, and even a quick project that only lasts a couple of months is a great chance to get an insight into a different sector.

"We've often seen our recommendations for widespread advertising campaigns taken on board by clients. It’s a satisfying feeling to see the results of your work when watching TV or seeing a billboard while driving."

What do you find most challenging about your job?

"While having a variety of clients is great, this also leads to the challenge of managing a number of projects at the same time. Time management skills are a must."

What advice would you give someone wanting to enter market research?

"Try to attend market research events or get in touch with someone from the industry to see whether it might be the right path for you."

Entry requirements

To become a market research analyst you need a diploma or Bachelor's degree in an area such as: 

  • marketing
  • statistics
  • business studies or sociology
  • computer science
  • psychology.

Secondary education

NCEA Level 3 is required to enter tertiary training. Useful subjects include social studies, English and maths.

Personal requirements

Market research analysts need to be:

  • good at written and verbal communication
  • good at listening
  • able to translate complex information into simple language
  • organised and accurate
  • able to work in a team
  • good at problem solving
  • able to keep information private.

While having a variety of clients is great, this also leads to the challenge of managing a number of projects at the same time. Time management skills are a must.

Photo: Andrew Dodge

Andrew Dodge

Market Research Analyst

Useful experience

Useful experience for market research analysts includes:

  • advertising
  • marketing
  • research
  • analytics.

Find out more about training

Research Association New Zealand
021 139 2739 - secretary@researchassociation.org.nz - www.researchassociation.org.nz
Check out related courses

What are the chances of getting a job?

Chances of getting a job as a market research analyst average

Opportunities for market research analysts are average due to stable worker numbers and steady turnover.

Graduates typically enter the research industry through graduate roles with one of the large market research firms. It is useful for graduates to gain experience through work placements or internships while they are studying.

Technology changing the market research industry

While traditional market research methods, such as surveying and focus groups, are still used, changing technology has led to more data coming from other sources such as the internet. 

For example, a market research firm could analyse a database of information about how a business' online customers use their website. Using this analysis, and other research, they could then make recommendations to the business about how to market to their customers.

As a result, chances are best for market research analysts who specialise in data science and analytics. These skills are in demand.

Types of employers varied

Market research analysts may work for:

  • research firms
  • large private companies
  • government departments.

Some market research analysts run their own businesses.

Sources

  • Allen, O, head of research, Perceptive, careers.govt.nz interview, May 2018.
  • Bree, R, chief executive, Research Association New Zealand, careers.govt.nz interview, June 2018.
  • Hercock, C, managing director – NZ, Ipsos, careers.govt.nz interview, May 2018.
  • Research Association New Zealand, 'Conference 2017 Wrap Up', Interview Magazine, September 2017, (www.researchassociation.org.nz).

(This information is a guide only. Find out more about the sources of our job opportunities information)

Progression and specialisations

Market research analysts may progress to work in managerial or supervisory roles in market research agencies and other businesses – mainly larger corporations or government departments. Many also choose to work as contractors or start their own businesses.

Market research analysts may specialise in:

  • qualitative research – for example, organising face-to-face focus groups or interviews to collect public and business opinion about products, services, advertising campaigns or organisations
  • quantitative research – for example, analysing and interpreting surveys conducted through face-to-face interviewing, the telephone or the internet.

However, most employers expect market research analysts to be able to do both qualitative and quantitative research.

A woman interviews another woman

Market research analysts interview people to find out their opinions on a subject

Last updated 26 June 2018